A Simple Life · A Simple, Honest Life

Email Subscriptions

I’ve been thinking a lot about time lately. Mostly about ways in which I can take back my time from other things and people and make it my own again. Sometimes I come up with really big ideas for this and other times I just think small.

Here’s a small idea that took up more time while I was doing it, but has really shown to have a great payoff.

I was trying to track my phone usage last month and have really clear ‘No Phone Time’ sessions blocked out. Like most people, I start checking my phone within a half hour of waking up. I like to keep my mail app clear of those little red notifications that tell me I have email. That means every time I pick up my phone and see a mail notification I feel compelled to check the email, sort it and in turn remove the notification.

The problem with this is that I was getting a lot of junk mail. Subscriptions I didn’t remember signing up for, discounts for stores I shopped at one time, reminders about sales or points expiring, etc. So when I’d get a text on my phone or even use it to check the time I would end up spending 5-10 minutes more than I wanted to on it going through all the new email subscription junk I would get. Over the course of the day this could end up sucking up an average 30 minutes of my time. Our most precious resource.

So I started unsubscribing. Which at first took up even more time. Some places make it so easy to unsubscribe and others make it a bit of a puzzle. My favorite ones are the ones the iPhone flags and they have just a simple unsubscribe button at the top.

Then there’s the unsubscribe links you have to click, usually found hidden away at the bottom of the email.

That will take you to a website where sometimes you just have to click a button saying ‘opt out of emails’ or you have to reenter your email, or (the worst) individually select which emails you’d like to opt out of.

These are the worst and most time consuming.

Here is the good news. I did this for a solid two weeks and it took up more time than I wanted, but now I’ve started to notice a huge decrease in my emails (and the time I spend checking them. Instead of 25 notifications in the morning and five more every half hour I’m getting three in the morning and about 10 total throughout the day. A major improvement in my time, wallet and well being.

A great way to practice digital minimalism as well. Less distractions on our phones means less phone time over all. I’ve still got a few more companies emailing, but I’ve been practicing the unsubscribe method and I wanted to encourage you all to do the same if you’re feeling like too much of your time is spent on email.

A Simple, Honest Life · Simple Life

Phone Apps

Image result for amazon ruining workers
South Park did a great bit on Amazon’s vicious cycle of consumers and workers.

It was AMAZON PRIME DAY this week! Which extended into not one day, but two days (they should probably rename it), and a CONCERT (which I watched, because Taylor Swift). All aimed at getting you to CONSUME, CONSUME, CONSUME. They even have PRE-SALE events! Come on! Buy something you didn’t even think about as something you WANTED (never mind NEED) until you saw it on your super convenient app that you open several times a day. As if Black Friday wasn’t bad enough.

Well, I deleted my Amazon Prime app for prime day and haven’t downloaded it again since. I’m a big Amazon shopper for household items. Toilet paper, paper towels, laundry detergent. The stuff I don’t want to get at the store a haul up three slights of stairs. I figure I can get on a desktop compute from now on to buy those things though. I buy too much stuff on Amazon as it is just for the convenience of having the app at my fingertips and all my payment information saved on there.

When I talk about a simple life in regards to a minimalist mindset I think people tend to think about their physical space. Cleaning closets, downsizing kitchen utensils, donating items etc. I want to share about the last eight months or so where I started minimizing my phone apps and let me tell you – it feels great! I think digital minimalism is super underrated and not talked about as much as our physical spaces.

How many shopping apps do you have on your phone? If you had asked me a year ago I would have had over five, at least. Amazon, Target, Modcloth, Vinted, you name it! And how many apps do you have in general? Don’t count the ones you can’t delete. Go ahead, count. I have 43.

Social and entertainment apps take up the most of my space and those include Facebook, Messenger, Instagram, Goodreads, Twitter, Unfold, Podcast Preview and Messenger. Then I’ve got an entertainment section and a music section.

And that’s kind of it. The second page over has some financial apps – my bank, credit card and venmo – but I look at those more as necessities than wants.

Cutting down apps isn’t just about the look and feel of your phone though. Yes, it’s true that my phone is now simpler and easier to navigate, but overall it does one really important thing for me that I hope can give you an alternative to your current situation. Not only does having an excess of shopping and game apps on your phone make you waste more money, but it also wastes our most valuable resource: time. At the end of the day time is our ONLY commodity. Can’t shop, play games, or browse cat pics if you’re dead. And (morbid moment) that could happen at any moment. Do we want to spend hours of our day scrolling our feeds, or engaging in conversation with friends? Do we want to half watch a movie while online shopping at our fingertips, or do we want to be fully engaged?

I used to wake up in the mornings and just sit on my phone for two hours before work. Now that my apps are hidden away I tend to just spend about 15-20 minutes looking at my social and entertainment apps when I get home. There’s a glorious time when I get home from work where I’m alone for about 30 minutes. I take that time to do my phone thing. I’ll do a bit of Duolingo, check my Insta, say hi to the family on Facebook and look up recipes on Pintrest. It’s my phone time. That’s not to say I’m not looking at my phone a few times a day at work, in the morning or after dinner. I’m just being more conscious about phone time. I’m not perfect and I’m still learning. But I think the first step of that is to be CONCISION of our phone time.

I even deleted *deep breath* Wizards Unite this week. I was so looking forward to this game. I wanted it to be good. I wanted it to have the same connotations that Pokemon Go had a first. Kids and adults in the parks, running after a freshly spawned Snorlax. The truth is it’s kind of boring, doesn’t make much sense and has started to feel like a chore rather than something I wanted to spend my time on. I deleted it and I have zero regrets about it. In fact it feels like a huge weight off my shoulders.

This is just a small post about the benefits I’ve seen from minimizing my phone apps. I would like to go more in depth into this in the future, but for now here is just a few ideas for your own mental health. I’ve got a whole post in mind for no phone zones: bedroom, bathroom, dinners out, etc. I think I just want to put the idea in your brain for now about considering the minimization of phone apps. Really analyzing what the apps are doing for you and if they’re bringing value to your life or if you just find yourself opening them at random and hoping for some distraction.

Something to considering going into the weekend.

Book Reviews

Listen Liberal: Or, Whatever Happened to the Party of the People by Thomas Frank

In my quest to be more well rounded in my news consumption this month, I picked up a few different political books to consume. One of these was a middle of the road book, written by a liberal, condemning liberals.

I really enjoyed this book and it was really eye opening for me. I think what I’m going to learn most about my no news, fox news, cnn, world news challenge this month is that I really do live in a blue bubble here in Portland. I only talk to people who think like I do. I only read news that confirms what I already believe to be true.

If this book taught me anything it’s that I don’t really know anything. I know what I choose to read and what I choose to hear.

Now this book isn’t without its faults. Frank seems to have a personnel vendetta against innovation and Uber in particular. Not without reason, but it also goes a bit far. Like, innovation isn’t BAD, and it’s a good thing liberals support innovations. However, it’s not ALL THERE IS, and focusing solely on that as the key to solve all our woes is not helpful. Not EVERYONE is going to want to be college educated and start their own business that will turn into a monopoly. We need to make sure those people still have access to good jobs with fair wages.

That’s where we are falling behind: with the working class. We are too focused on the ‘Professional’ class. The elite educated class. We believe all our problems can be solved with education and the flip side of that is that we are leaving out a huge voting populous that used to be ours. We used to be the party of the people. What happened?

Frank sets out to show how our two party system has morphed into Conservative and Not-As-Conservative and I think he does a pretty good job. Which billionaire do you want to elect next that has no real idea of the struggle of the working class? We cannot elect people solely on which candidate is more moral: we (liberals) will lose that election again and again if we continue down that path.

I voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016 because I could afford to vote for her over Trump. I am an educated college graduate with a good job and I can choose morality over everything else because I will continue to have income in my field. Clinton’s proposed policies supported people like me. They supported the educated and the innovators. The white collar workers. What they ignored were the blue collar workers.

Blue collar workers who might have no interest in being college educated (and that’s okay!). Not everyone wants to be! AND THAT’S OKAY. And those used to be our people, liberals were the party of the working class – and we have left them behind. We have told them there is no place for them among our elite educated class where everyone supposedly wants to be. They cannot always afford to vote for morality as much as they might want to.

62,984,825 people voted for Trump and they aren’t ALL racist misogynistic idiots. But I’m going to go out on a limb and say that those with high moral standards in that number were people of white privilege that didn’t feel like they had a lot to lose on the morality front of the election. If the election had been about whether to vote for a racist or not, I believe that most people would have voted for the person who wasn’t a outright racist. But that’s not all there was at stake for those people.

A lot of those people who voted for Trump don’t have to worry about policies that effect people who aren’t white, straight and male (privledged people) because they ARE those things and they will always be protected by that. They might, however, have to worry about their manual labor jobs. They have families to support, rent to pay, mouths to feed, and they need their jobs to do that. And a college education isn’t always worth a whole lot when you live in small town America. So all they’re hearing from the liberals is that jobs will come to them if they just go to a big city and get a degree. INNOVATE! Otherwise you’ll get left behind. It’s YOUR fault you work where you do. Those jobs don’t work anymore. Get an education and all will be solved. And that doesn’t exactly work for them.

That is what Frank’s book is all about. It’s not perfect, it has its flaws. Frank is by no means a Trump guy. He hates the guy as he says several times. Frank’s beef is with liberals throwing elitism at blue collar workers as a solution for them. A solution that doesn’t resonate with them. And when they’re being told ‘too bad, that’s how things work now’, that message doesn’t resonate. They turn to the party who is telling them they will keep their jobs (even if they won’t). The turn to the party that says they will fight for their right to good wages in a factory (even if they won’t). Because the rhetoric liberals are pushing when it comes to the working class just isn’t realistic for them.